keeping stocks healthy Scotland

Fishermen want say in keeping stocks healthy – A blueprint to make Scotland’s fishing industry more stable and prosperous was launched yesterday by the Scottish Executive, and was broadly welcomed by the fishing industry.

The plan raises the prospect of catching fewer fish in order to rebuild stocks and then keep them at a healthy level.
The Scottish Fishermen’s Federation, the main catching organisation, said it shared the vision of a sustainable, viable and well-managed industry outlined in the document, but wanted to work alongside the executive in deciding the route to achieving that.
“We have to be careful that we get the balance right,” said Bertie Armstrong, SFF chief executive.
“There’s no point in creating a wildlife park for fish if you have destroyed the industry on the way to achieving that.
“There are many possible paths to this goal. Whichever path is chosen, the viability of the Scottish fishing industry must be assured along the way.”
The executive blueprint document was launched by Ross Finnie, fisheries minister, who said it set out steps to ensure a “sustainable, profitable and well-managed” industry.
On the sustainability of fishing stocks, the document says the past approach of fishing to the maximum level possible without causing stocks to collapse is inherently risky.
Instead, it proposes fishing at more moderate levels, to protect over-exploited stocks and help bring about greater long-term stability.
The executive is rejecting the option of fishing to the maximum level which is biologically achievable without collapsing the stock.
“This is the approach which has existed by default in the past,” says the report. “In theory it should allow the stocks to replenish themselves and continue to be harvested, but it is risky. It leaves the industry vulnerable to natural variations in the stock and therefore disruptive management.”
The approach it suggests is fishing at levels it believes will give the stocks a better chance of being able to grow as well as to replenish and therefore a higher chance of a larger and more stable stock.
As the document was launched, Richard Lochhead, SNP fisheries and rural affairs spokesman, called for Scotland to be given full control over its seas.
He said the long-overdue strategy contained no protection against damaging policies foisted on fishing communities by Brussels and the UK government in London. “As long as Scotland is trapped in the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), Scottish ministers will be unable to deliver any of their long-term objectives.”
His call coincided with the launch by the United Fishing Industry Alliance (UFIA) of its post-CFP plan for the future of the Scottish fishing industry.
UFIA, a body which includes the Cod Crusaders within it ranks, wants Britain to pull out of the CFP and be governed instead by the United Nations Law of the Sea, which allows coastal states to manage their “exclusive economic zones”.
Mr Lochhead said the UFIA plan offered a better way forward for Scotland and should not be dismissed out of hand by ministers.
A blueprint to make Scotland’s fishing industry more stable and prosperous was launched yesterday by the Scottish Executive, and was broadly welcomed by the fishing industry.
The plan raises the prospect of catching fewer fish in order to rebuild stocks and then keep them at a healthy level.
The Scottish Fishermen’s Federation, the main catching organisation, said it shared the vision of a sustainable, viable and well-managed industry outlined in the document, but wanted to work alongside the executive in deciding the route to achieving that.
“We have to be careful that we get the balance right,” said Bertie Armstrong, SFF chief executive.
“There’s no point in creating a wildlife park for fish if you have destroyed the industry on the way to achieving that.
“There are many possible paths to this goal. Whichever path is chosen, the viability of the Scottish fishing industry must be assured along the way.”
The executive blueprint document was launched by Ross Finnie, fisheries minister, who said it set out steps to ensure a “sustainable, profitable and well-managed” industry.
On the sustainability of fishing stocks, the document says the past approach of fishing to the maximum level possible without causing stocks to collapse is inherently risky.
Instead, it proposes fishing at more moderate levels, to protect over-exploited stocks and help bring about greater long-term stability.
The executive is rejecting the option of fishing to the maximum level which is biologically achievable without collapsing the stock.
“This is the approach which has existed by default in the past,” says the report. “In theory it should allow the stocks to replenish themselves and continue to be harvested, but it is risky. It leaves the industry vulnerable to natural variations in the stock and therefore disruptive management.”
The approach it suggests is fishing at levels it believes will give the stocks a better chance of being able to grow as well as to replenish and therefore a higher chance of a larger and more stable stock.
As the document was launched, Richard Lochhead, SNP fisheries and rural affairs spokesman, called for Scotland to be given full control over its seas.
He said the long-overdue strategy contained no protection against damaging policies foisted on fishing communities by Brussels and the UK government in London. “As long as Scotland is trapped in the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), Scottish ministers will be unable to deliver any of their long-term objectives.”
His call coincided with the launch by the United Fishing Industry Alliance (UFIA) of its post-CFP plan for the future of the Scottish fishing industry.
UFIA, a body which includes the Cod Crusaders within it ranks, wants Britain to pull out of the CFP and be governed instead by the United Nations Law of the Sea, which allows coastal states to manage their “exclusive economic zones”.
Mr Lochhead said the UFIA plan offered a better way forward for Scotland and should not be dismissed out of hand by ministers.
A blueprint to make Scotland’s fishing industry more stable and prosperous was launched yesterday by the Scottish Executive, and was broadly welcomed by the fishing industry.
The plan raises the prospect of catching fewer fish in order to rebuild stocks and then keep them at a healthy level.
The Scottish Fishermen’s Federation, the main catching organisation, said it shared the vision of a sustainable, viable and well-managed industry outlined in the document, but wanted to work alongside the executive in deciding the route to achieving that.
“We have to be careful that we get the balance right,” said Bertie Armstrong, SFF chief executive.
“There’s no point in creating a wildlife park for fish if you have destroyed the industry on the way to achieving that.
“There are many possible paths to this goal. Whichever path is chosen, the viability of the Scottish fishing industry must be assured along the way.”
The executive blueprint document was launched by Ross Finnie, fisheries minister, who said it set out steps to ensure a “sustainable, profitable and well-managed” industry.
On the sustainability of fishing stocks, the document says the past approach of fishing to the maximum level possible without causing stocks to collapse is inherently risky.
Instead, it proposes fishing at more moderate levels, to protect over-exploited stocks and help bring about greater long-term stability.
The executive is rejecting the option of fishing to the maximum level which is biologically achievable without collapsing the stock.

GRAEME SMITH

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